• Should be Empty:
Previous Projects
© 2019 Copyright Metal Restoration. All rights reserved | Terms and Conditions
CONTACT GREAT BRAK RIVER, WESTERN CAPE +27 (0) 44 620 4042  |  +27 (0) 83 292 3313
British Infantry sword and scabbard-  Awarded in 1901 for service in the Anglo- Boer War Whilst the sword sheathed and unsheathed smoothly, the surface metal of the sword (especially the blade) displayed advanced and very active corrosion.  Moisture had found its way into the scabbard at some point and wet the wooden strips on either side of the blade. This greatly impacted and precipitated the severe corrosion along the blade. Other than the corrosion on the metal surfaces there was no other physical damage or loss to the sword.  Treatment: The scabbard was dismantled, the inner wooden linings removed, and the residue build up cleaned. The inside was thoroughly cleaned to remove any corrosion and dirt that had accumulated inside.  Using a series of gentle chemical poultices and manual abrasion, all the tarnish, active corrosion and dirt was removed from all the metal surfaces. Pocking of the surfaces was treated up to a point, where the removal of original material became less desirable than the removal of the surface damage. Treatment of the blade was governed by the necessity to retain the etched surface design and insignias.  All surfaces were then re-polished to restore their luster. The ray skin grip, which was very dry and crusty, was treated with cellugel and a slight black pigment to restore the vibrance of the skin. The blade and skin grip were finished off with a museum wax coating, and the balance of the metal surfaces were sealed with Paraloid B72 to protect them from further decay.
Previous Projects
British Infantry sword and scabbard-  Awarded in 1901 for service in the Anglo-Boer Ward Whilst the sword sheathed and unsheathed smoothly, the surface metal of the sword (especially the blade) displayed advanced and very active corrosion.  Moisture had found its way into the scabbard at some point and wet the wooden strips on either side of the blade. This greatly impacted and precipitated the severe corrosion along the blade.  Other than the corrosion on the metal surfaces there was no other physical damage or loss to the sword. Treatment: The scabbard was dismantled, the inner wooden linings removed, and the residue build up cleaned. The inside was thoroughly cleaned to remove any corrosion and dirt that had accumulated inside.  Using a series of gentle chemical poultices and manual abrasion, all the tarnish, active corrosion and dirt was removed from all the metal surfaces. Pocking of the surfaces was treated up to a point, where the removal of original material became less desirable than the removal of the surface damage. Treatment of the blade was governed by the necessity to retain the etched surface design and insignias.  All surfaces were then re-polished to restore their luster. The ray skin grip, which was very dry and crusty, was treated with cellugel and a slight black pigment to restore the vibrance of the skin. The blade and skin grip were finished off with a museum wax coating, and the balance of the metal surfaces were sealed with Paraloid B72 to protect them from further decay. This sword arrived with; severe plate damage, heavily tarnished and thick active corrosion. Treatment via chemical poultices and manual abrasion resurrected this special piece of history.
CONTACT GREAT BRAK RIVER, WESTERN CAPE +27 (0) 44 620 4042  |  +27 (0) 83 292 3313
GREAT BRAK RIVER, WESTERN CAPE +27 (0) 44 620 4042  |  +27 (0) 83 292 3313 |  CONTACT US  |
METAL RESTORATION A N T I Q U E Specialist restoration of metal antiques & collectables
GREAT BRAK RIVER, WESTERN CAPE +27 (0) 44 620 4042  |  +27 (0) 83 292 3313
METAL RESTORATION A N T I Q U E Specialist restoration of metal antiques & collectables